CBT Reduces Shame in Individuals with Social Anxiety Disorder

According to a recent study published in Plos One, cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) may help reduce experiences of shame (specifically associated with how individuals judge themselves) among patients diagnosed with social anxiety disorder (SAD.) Participants (n= 161) in the current study were initially evaluated for experiences of shame, guilt, depression, and social anxiety. Participants diagnosed with SAD (n=67) were assigned to a CBT treatment condition; the remaining participants (n=94) were assigned to two samples of healthy controls. According to results, shame, social anxiety, and depressive symptoms were each associated in participants with SAD. Further, shame was shown to be elevated among SAD patients compared to the main healthy control. Following treatment, shame significantly reduced among participants with SAD. These findings suggest that shame and social anxiety are associated, that socially anxious patients may be more likely to experience shame than patients without social anxiety, and that CBT treatment can help reduce shame among individuals with SAD.

Hedman, E., Strom, P., Stunkel, A., & Mortberg, E. (April 19, 2013). Shame and Guilt in Social Anxiety Disorder: Effects of Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Association with Social Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms. Plos One, 8, 4.