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Integrating New Wave Therapies and CBT

In this video from a recent Beck Institute Workshop, Dr. Aaron Beck discusses how new wave therapies can be integrated into the cognitive therapy (CT) framework. Dr. Beck describes when it is helpful to utilize newer strategies that encompass for example, acceptance and commitment therapy, mindfulness, and dialectical behavior therapy. Dr. Beck emphasizes the importance of using these strategies within the general theoretical model of CT and specific case formulation of the disorder in order to address patients’ specific needs based on their individual case conceptualization.

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Validation for Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder

During a recent Beck Institute Workshop, Dr. Aaron Beck explains that in recent years eastern philosophies and religions have had an increased influence on CBT and which have been incorporated into mindfulness based cognitive therapy, acceptance and commitment therapy, and dialectic behavior therapy. In discussing DBT, he emphasizes the importance of validation with borderline personality disorder patients.

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Individual Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) and Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) Improve Depressive Symptoms in Patients with Diabetes

Depression is a common comorbidity of diabetes, undesirably affecting patients’ physical and mental functioning. Psychological interventions are effective treatments for depression in the general population as well as in patients with a chronic disease. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of individual mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) and individual cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) in comparison with a waiting-list control condition for treating depressive symptoms in adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. In this randomized controlled trial, 94 outpatients with diabetes and comorbid depressive symptoms (i.e., Beck Depression Inventory-II [BDI-II] ?14) were randomized to MBCT (n = 31), CBT (n = 32), or waiting list (n = 31). All participants completed written questionnaires and interviews at pre- and postmeasurement (3 months later). Primary outcome measure was severity of depressive symptoms (BDI-II and Toronto Hamilton Depression Rating Scale). Anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7), well-being (Well-Being Index), diabetes-related distress (Problem Areas In Diabetes), and HbA1clevels were assessed as secondary outcomes. Results showed that participants receiving MBCT and CBT reported significantly greater reductions in depressive symptoms compared with patients in the waiting-list control condition (respectively, P = 0.004 and P < 0.001; d = 0.80 and 1.00; clinically relevant improvement 26% and 29% vs. 4%). Both interventions also had significant positive effects on anxiety, well-being, and diabetes-related distress. No significant effect was found on HbA1c values.
CONCLUSIONS: Both individual MBCT and CBT are effective in improving a range of psychological symptoms in individuals with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

Tovote, K. A., Fleer, J., Snippe, E., Peeters, A. C. T. M., Emmelkamp, P. M. G., Sanderman, R., … Schroevers, M. J. (2014). Individual Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) and Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) for Treating Depressive Symptoms in Patients with Diabetes: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial. Diabetes Care, doi: 10.2337/dc13-2918 1935-5548.

Mindfulness Techniques Involving Focus

In this video from a recent Beck Institute Workshop, Dr. Aaron Beck describes mindfulness techniques involving focus, which help clients distance themselves from ruminating thinking. Dr. Judith Beck notes that shifting focus can help clients modify their behavior to match their goals and values.

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The Utility of Mindfulness-Based CBT Techniques

In this video from a recent Beck Institute Workshop, Dr. Aaron Beck discusses ways to integrate mindfulness-based CBT techniques into treatment. He provides an example to demonstrate how mindfulness techniques can often help bring about symptom relief, while other key CBT techniques, such as cognitive restructuring, target the underlying problem.

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CBT Relapse Prevention

In this video from a recent Beck Institute Workshop, Dr. Aaron Beck describes examples of the  application of techniques such as mindfulness, acceptance, and validation. He also explains how these and other important techniques can be used to enhance relapse prevention.

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A Monthly Summary of Beck Institute Updates [June 2013]

In its efforts to encourage the growth and dissemination of CBT throughout the world, Beck Institute has expanded its online presence across social media and other platforms. To keep you (our readers) informed of our most recent updates, we’ve decided to implement a monthly summary including: blogs, CBT articles, CBT trainings, and other updates for our readers. We’re very excited about some of the new developments at Beck Institute, including our new Core Curriculum. Please use the following links to go back and read what you may have missed from June 2013:

Click here for a complete schedule of Beck Institute workshops

See what you missed in May 2013

Systems of Psychotherapy (Part 3)

In this video from Beck Institute’s recent CBT Workshop for Students and Faculty, Dr. Aaron Beck first explains the fundamental methodology of meditation-based therapies, including acceptance and commitment therapy and mindfulness-based therapy. Dr. Beck explains that these therapies require patients to actively experience negative, dysfunctional thoughts and accept them without trying to change them. Through acceptance, patients are able to decenter themselves, gain greater distance, and greater objectivity. Next Dr. Beck delves into relationship-based therapies. Rooted in Rogerian therapy, the main tenets of relationship-based therapies include the therapist’s total acceptance of the patient, genuine warmth, and accurate empathy. Dr. Beck describes these tenets as important qualities of every therapist.

Click here to view part 1 of this video on the Beck Institute YouTube channel.

Click here to view part 2 of this video on the Beck Institute YouTube channel.

Online Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy Reduces Perceived Stress Levels

Cognitive Behavior Therapy StudyThere is evidence that Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) can be an effective intervention for a wide range of chronic health problems.  Previous research suggests that mindfulness practices help alleviate stress. The authors of the current study sought to determine if online MBCT would also help decrease perceived stress levels among a self-referred sample.  Participants (100) took part in a 6-week mindfulness based stress reduction and cognitive therapy intervention program. They completed the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) before the program, after the program, and at 1-month follow up.  Results showed that online MBCT significantly reduced perceived stress levels; perceived stress levels remained stable at the 1-month follow up; and pre and post effect sizes were equivalent to levels found in other mindfulness and cognitive therapies delivered face-to-face. This study provides preliminary support for online based MBCT.

Krusche A., Cyhlarova E., King S., Williams J.M.G.  Mindfulness online:  A preliminary evaluation of the feasibility of web-based mindfulness courses and the impact on stress.  BMJ Open 2012; 2: e000803 doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2011-000803