Cognitive Therapy and Psychodynamic Therapy

In this video from a recent Beck Institute workshop, Dr. Aaron Beck discusses the similarities and differences between cognitive therapy and modern psychodynamic therapy.  Both theories delve into the significance of automatic thoughts and their meanings, and both utilize action plans in therapy.  Dr. Beck explains, however, that cognitive therapy is based on the generic cognitive model and requires a structured, action-oriented session, while wpsychodynamic therapy utilizes a more discursive, free-flowing session oriented toward listening. To watch an additional video of Dr. Beck discussing the generic cognitive model, click here.

Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Substance Abuse

In this clip from a recent 3-day workshop at the Beck Institute for Cognitive Behavior Therapy, Dr. Aaron Beck discusses how CBT can be used to treat substance use disorders. Dr. Beck explains how the generic cognitive model can be applied to specific situations, such as when a patient is faced with a craving. He also describes the process of coping with cravings via experiential CBT treatment.  Beck Institute will be hosting its first ever CBT for Substance Abuse workshop this year.  For more information visit our website.

The Generic Cognitive Model

In this clip from a recent 3-day workshop at Beck Institute for Cognitive Behavior Therapy, Dr. Aaron Beck first describes the generic cognitive model and explains how it can be adapted to a number of different disorders. Then Dr. Beck illustrates the application of CBT to panic disorder and chronic fatigue syndrome— just two examples of the many disorders to which CBT is effectively applied.

Generic Cognitive Model

As a way of simplifying the cognitive model to facilitate a more rapid formulation of a case, Dr. Aaron Beck has proposed a generic cognitive model model. Dr. Beck has applied this model to a host of difficult presentations ranging from bipolar depression to hallucinations to everyday problems like procrastination.

Dr. Beck explains that it is possible to simplify the complete cognitive model by consolidating the various processes into a cognitive-behavioral triad. This procedure can provide a quick snap shot of a selected condition sparing the necessity for spelling out each of the variables.