Characteristics of U.S. Veterans Who Begin and Complete Prolonged Exposure and Cognitive Processing Therapy for PTSD

New Study (1)Abstract

This retrospective chart-review study examined patient-level correlates of initiation and completion of evidence-based psychotherapy (EBP) for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among treatment-seeking U.S. veterans. We identified all patients (N = 796) in a large Veterans Affairs PTSD and anxiety clinic who attended at least 1 individual psychotherapy appointment with 1 of 8 providers trained in EBP. Within this group, 91 patients (11.4%) began EBP (either Cognitive Processing Therapy or Prolonged Exposure) and 59 patients (7.9%) completed EBP. The medical records of all EBP patients (n = 91) and a provider-matched sample of patients who received another form of individual psychotherapy (n = 66) were reviewed by 4 independent raters. Logistic regression analyses revealed that Iraq and Afghanistan veterans were less likely to begin EBP than veterans from other service eras, OR = 0.48, 95% CI = [0.24, 0.94], and veterans who were service connected for PTSD were more likely than veterans without service connection to begin EBP, OR = 2.33, 95% CI = [1.09, 5.03]. Among those who began EBP, Iraq and Afghanistan veteran status, OR = 0.09, 95% CI = [0.03, 0.30], and a history of psychiatric inpatient hospitalization, OR = 0.13, 95% CI = [0.03, 0.54], were associated with decreased likelihood of EBP completion.


Mott, J.M., Mondragon, S., Hundt, N.E., Beason-Smith, M., Grady, R.H., & Teng, E.J. (2014).Characteristics of U.S. veterans who begin and complete prolonged exposure and cognitive processing therapy for PTSD. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 27(3), 265-273.doi: 10.1002/jts.21927.