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Systems of Psychotherapy (Part 1)

In this video from Beck Institute’s recent CBT Workshop for Students and Faculty, Dr. Aaron Beck discusses cognitive behavior therapy within the context of systems of psychotherapy. Dr. Beck explains that CBT’s rich theoretical background has been validated and systemized and that the therapy itself is derived directly from the theory. CBT is part of a system of psychotherapy; its theory guides the selection of effective treatment methods for particular patients, across various disorders.

For CBT resources, visit: https://www.beckinstitute.org/cognitive-behavioural-therapy-courses.

The Positive and Negative Symptoms of Schizophrenia

In this video from a recent workshop at the Beck Institute, Dr. Aaron Beck discusses CBT treatment for the positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. First, Dr. Beck clarifies the difference between negative symptoms (such as social withdrawal) and positive symptoms (such as delusions and hallucinations). Then he explains that treating the negative symptoms of schizophrenia helps patients to reengage in life. As patients become more engaged, their positive symptoms (delusions and hallucinations) tend to decrease. Likewise, treatment that reduces positive symptoms helps patients to overcome their social withdrawal and engage in the real world.

For more information about CBT workshops, visit www.beckinstitute.org/cbt-training.

Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy and Cognitive Behavior Therapy

Dr. Aaron Beck discusses his experience in psychoanalytic psychotherapy and some of the strategies he used early in his career. Dr. Beck explains how using what he learned from the behavior movement and Albert Ellis he was able to modify his therapeutic strategies to be more effective.  Click here to learn more about Cognitive Behavior Therapy.

Dr. Aaron Beck’s Current Research

Dr. Aaron Beck discusses his current work with leading researchers at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Beck is working with patients with difficult cases of schizophrenia. His team has tried to undercut the negative attitude of the participants by giving them a series of successful experiences to build their confidence. Instilling positive affect provides motivation. Dr. Beck is hopeful that this research will yield far-reaching results. To ask Dr. Beck your question we invite you to attend a Beck Institute workshop. Register today for our next workshop at www.beckinstitute.org/cbt-workshops.

April 4 – 6, 2011, Cognitive Behavior Therapy Workshop Level I

April 2011: Psychologists, psychiatrists, physicians, social workers, professors, counselors, and other professionals from mental health, medical, and related fields traveled from 18 states and 8 countries, including Australia, Brazil, Canada, France, Ireland, New Zealand, Peru, and United Arab Emirates. Pictured above-left, Dr. Aaron T. Beck conducts a roleplay with Ricardo Luiz Malina Losso, a psychiatrist from Brazil, to demonstrate useful techniques to use for challenging problems when working with patients. Dr. Beck also conducted a live patient session that was viewed (via closed-circuit television) by participants in the April 4 – 6, 2011, Cognitive Behavior Therapy Workshop Level I at Beck Institute.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Treatment Plan

Following the patient interview Dr. Beck answered questions from participants in a case discussion (pictured below), during which he explained what the next session should include (see video clip here). Dr. Beck explained agenda setting, beginning with a review of homework and went on to explain that he asks patients, “What problems do you want my help in solving today?” to guide them into naming the problems (as opposed to giving a full description at that moment), then prioritize the problems and let him know roughly about how much of the session they’d like to devote to each one.

(Right) Dr. Judith Beck conducts a roleplay with David Black, a psychologist from Missouri.  Dr. Beck discussed how to differentiate between practical and psychological problems, and how to use a cognitive framework to understand why psychological problems arise. Participants received professional training in Cognitive Behavior Therapy from Aaron T. Beck, M.D., Judith S. Beck, Ph.D., Leslie Sokol, Ph.D., and Norman Cotterell, Ph.D. Trainees participated in seminars and case discussions, reviewed videos of therapy sessions, observed

and engaged in demonstration roleplays among other activities. More event highlights:

Case Conference with Aaron T. Beck, M.D.

Judith_Aaron BeckEarlier this week, students, faculty and professionals from local universities and mental health organizations visited the Beck Institute for Cognitive Therapy and Research to watch a live patient session, conducted by Dr. Aaron Beck, followed by a case conference. Although we cannot disclose the particulars of the case, below are some of the general points that came up, from participants in attendance, in a Q & A session with Dr. Beck:

Aaron Beck

That patients often need to test their automatic thoughts and beliefs by doing behavioral experiments in order to fully change their ideas. Dr. Beck also emphasized the importance of the therapeutic alliance in facilitating patient progress. Dr. Beck observed where anxiety is concerned there are often images and thought patterns. Dr. Beck explained how he discovered images and their application to the Cognitive Model (see video clip here). He explained why it’s critical to build a patient’s confidence so that he or she can take some control over his or her symptoms, including anxious images. Thanks to all the professors, students and professionals who came to visit the Beck Institute!

Advanced Cognitive Behavior Therapy Experiential Workshop at Beck Institute: November 8 – 10, 2010

Aaron T. Beck, M.D.NOVEMBER 2010: (Left) Dr. Aaron Beck answers questions after conducting a live patient session that was viewed (via closed-circuit television) by participants in the Advanced Experiential Cognitive Behavior Therapy Workshop. The workshop was attended by psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, counselors and other professionals who traveled from Australia, Brazil, Canada, Mexico, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, United Kingdom, and ten U.S. states. (Right) Dr. Judith Beck conducts a roleplay with Saima Salman, MSc, a psychotherapist from Singapore. The Advanced Workshop was designed for professionals at intermediate and advanced levels of trainingJudith S. Beck, Ph.D. and experience who wanted to enhance their ability to deliver cognitive behavior therapy efficiently and effectively to clients who pose a challenge in treatment. Participants presented cases from their practices. Beck Institute faculty (Aaron T. Beck, M.D., Judith S. Beck, Ph.D., Leslie Sokol, Ph.D., and Norman Cotterell, Ph.D.) taught the group advanced conceptualization techniques and treatment planning, then demonstrated cognitive behavior therapy interventions through demonstration roleplays and supervised participants in dyadic roleplays. Many topics were covered, including anger, early trauma, self harm behavior, binge eating, substance abuse, anxiety, chronic depression, hopelessness and suicidalitiy. Developing the therapeutic relationship and engaging reluctant patients in treatment were emphasized. 123456

Cognitive Behavior Therapy Workshop for Professionals at Beck Institute: September 27 – 29, 2010

Aaron T. Beck, M.D.SEPTEMBER 2010: Psychologists, psychiatrists, social workers, professors, school counselors, nurse practitioners, and other professionals from mental health, medical, and related fields traveled from 18 states and 10 countries, including Australia, Brazil, Canada, Germany, Hong Kong, Jamaica, Japan, Netherlands, Pakistan and United Kingdom. Pictured above-left, Aaron T. Beck, M.D. answers questions after conducting a live patient session that was viewed (via closed-circuit television) by participants in the Cognitive Behavior Therapy workshop at Beck Institute.

Aaron T Beck, M.D., also met with scholarship winners Ellen Driessen, MSc, Jordana Muroff, Ph.D., LICSW, and Scott Ries, MSW, who were all granted full tuition scholarships to attend one of our 3-Day workshops.  They represent three out of ten winners from our Scholarship Competition held in March 2010, which received over 880 entries from around the world!

Participants received professional training in Cognitive Behavior Therapy from Aaron T. Beck, M.D., Judith S. Beck, Ph.D., Leslie Sokol, Ph.D., and Norman Cotterell, Ph.D. Trainees participated in seminars and case discussions, reviewed videos of therapy sessions, and observed demonstration roleplays among other activities. More event highlights:

Beck Institute Participants (1)Beck Institute Participants (2)Judith S. Beck, Ph.D. and Aaron T. Beck, M.D.Leslie Sokol, Ph.D.Norman Cotterell, Ph.D.Judith S. Beck, Ph.D.

Happy Birthday Thanks

Dr. Aaron Beck sends his heartfelt thanks to ALL of you–students, friends, and colleagues from around the world–who sent so many warm birthday wishes to him.

Two students from Romania sent him the following letter and photo:

Happy Birthday Dr. Beck from two students from Romania, Fabian and Alina.

We had the wonderful opportunity to meet you in Boston at the WCBT Congress, and Dr. Judith Beck as well. We also took a few memorable pictures and we would like to send it to you.

We were students of Dr. Daniel David, in Romania and currently we are graduate students in New York. We wanted to congratulate you for your birthday, wish you all the best and assure you of our total appreciation, respect and love. We thank you for everything you are, you did and you mean for thousands of people across the globe and for many, many generations to come.

Thank you Dr. Beck and Happy Birthday again!

Please receive our humble and warmest wishes,

Fabian and Alina Agiurgioaei Boie

Boston WCBT 2010 Romanian Students