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Cognitive Therapy for Schizophrenia

Here’s what Kevin Benbow emailed to us about his experience supervising a clinician with her first schizophrenia patient:

As a clinical supervisor for a small, rural mental health clinic in Arizona I get the opportunity to supervise and train behavioral health technicians.  Such individuals have a wide range of experience and education levels and are allowed to practice under Arizona State law if they receive supervision from a licensed Behavioral Health Professional.

One of these clinicians has been particularly receptive to the cognitive model and has been helping many of her clients identify their automatic thoughts and subsequently test them.  Recently she assessed a client who was subsequently diagnosed with schizophrenia.  She had only weeks before experienced her first psychotic episode.  Read more

Choosing a CT Therapist?

Cognitive Therapy (CT) has been demonstrated to be effective for many disorders in hundreds of clinical trials — it’s one of the most widely tested forms of psychotherapy.  As CT becomes increasingly favored among consumers and insurance companies, many therapists are now “saying” that they practice CT, even if they have not actually received sufficient training. Often, they may simply be incorporating some elements of CT into their practice, without fully delivering actual Cognitive Therapy treatment.

In 1998, Aaron T. Beck, M.D. (who developed Cognitive Therapy in the 1960s) and other leaders in the field established a non-profit certifying organization, the Academy of Cognitive Therapy (ACT), to serve consumers, thoroughly evaluate  therapists, and certify those who are truly qualified Cognitive Therapists. If you’re looking for a good Cognitive Therapist, we recommend that you search for an ACT-Certified Cognitive Therapist.