Posts

CBT for Depression and Anxiety

CBT Training at Beck Institute

Conceptualizing individual clients using the Cognitive Model at Beck Institute’s CBT for Depression and Anxiety Workshop.

2012 Beck Institute Scholarship Competition Winners

Congratulations to the winners of our full-tuition Beck Institute Scholarship Competition:

Shannon Couture
Rebecca Greif
John Guerry
Brian Hall
Cara Lewis
Nina Martin
Barbara Van Noppen
Rick Pessagno
Darunee Phukao
Shari Steinman

Our Scholarship Competition received more than 600 entries from around the world! The commitment to the study and practice of CBT shown by all of the applicants was truly inspiring.

If you missed the Scholarship Competition and you are currently a graduate student or faculty member, you would still be eligible to apply to the Student and Faculty Workshop, which is being offered at a reduced rate ($650 instead of $1200) even if you were not awarded the scholarship – click here for more information.

October 31 – November, 2011, Cognitive Behavior Therapy Workshop Level I: Depression and Anxiety

November 2011: Psychologists, psychiatrists, physicians, social workers, professors, counselors, nurses and other professionals from mental health, medical, and related fields traveled from 11 states and 5 countries (including Brazil, Singapore, Canada, India, and the Dominican Republic) to attend this month’s Cognitive Behavior Therapy Workshop Level I on Depression and Anxiety at Beck Institute.

Participants had the opportunity to gain professional training from Aaron T. Beck, M.D., Judith S. Beck, Ph.D., and Amy Cunningham, Ph.D. Trainees participated in seminars and case discussions, reviewed videos of therapy sessions, observed and engaged in demonstration role-plays among other activities.

Cognitive Therapy Demonstration

Participants had the benefit of watching Dr. Aaron Beck conduct a live patient session, which was viewed via closed-circuit television. Following the patient interview Dr. Beck answered questions from participants in a case discussion (pictured above left), during which he explained what the next session should include. Dr. Beck explained agenda setting, beginning with a review of homework and went on to explain that he asks patients, “What problems do you want my help in solving today?” to guide them into naming the problems (as opposed to giving a full description at that moment), then prioritize the problems and let him know roughly about how much of the session they’d like to devote to each one. Participants noted some key techniques that Dr. Beck used which they found to be quite useful:

  • Normalizing patient’s emotions and beliefs
  • Providing patient with language with which they can describe and validate their thoughts
  • Instilling hope and reassuring successful treatment
  • Trying a variety of methods including imagery
  • Collaboration with the patient in terms of treatment model to prevent the patient from seeing the therapist as an authority figure
  • Finding some light anecdotes, humor can be a nice touch in sessions

Following the questions regarding the patient session, Dr. Beck answered participants’ questions on other subjects (video will be posted on our YouTube Channel).

Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Depression

Dr. Judith Beck (pictured left) spoke about cognitive behavior therapy with depressed patients and their automatic thoughts.  She emphasized psychoeducation, treatment planning, goal setting, and activity scheduling with patients.

Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Anxiety

Dr. Amy Cunningham (pictured below) spoke about the need for anxiety and the need to learn how to cope with it.  She emphasized the use of teaching problem-solving skills and building self-efficacy.

We are so pleased that so many professionals from all over the world were able to come to the Beck Institute for such an exciting workshop!

More event highlights:

What is Dr. Aaron Beck’s 90th birthday wish? (Students Ask Dr. Beck – Part EIGHT)

This is the eighth question from the Q&A portion of Beck Institute’s 3-Day CBT Workshop on Depression and Anxiety for students and post-doctoral fellows, held on August 15 – 17, 2011. In this video, Dr. Beck shares his 90th birthday wish with participants at Beck Institute’s annual Student and Faculty Workshop, on CBT for Depression and Anxiety. Dr. Beck discusses the dissemination of CBT by effective cognitive therapists. He also discusses the status of cognitive therapy in the US and abroad as well as the importance of increasing education of cognitive therapy within the US.

What research is Dr. Beck presently involved in? (Students Ask Dr. Beck – Part SEVEN)

This is the seventh question from the Q&A portion of Beck Institute’s 3-Day CBT Workshop on Depression and Anxiety for students and post-doctoral fellows, held on August 15 – 17, 2011. In this video Dr. Aaron Beck discusses research he is presently involved in and/or leading at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Beck explains the work being done by three different teams within his unit; including clinical trials with suicidal patients, groundbreaking research on CBT treatment for schizophrenia, and a community mental health center project involving dissemination of cognitive behavior therapy.

What is the synergistic effect of medication and CBT? (Students Ask Dr. Beck – PART SIX)

This is the sixth question from the Q&A portion of Beck Institute’s 3-Day CBT Workshop on Depression and Anxiety for students and post-doctoral fellows, held on August 15 – 17, 2011. In this video Dr. Aaron Beck discusses the evolution of neurobiological research examining changes in the brain before and after cognitive therapy; in particular, Dr. Beck notes how CBT has been shown to decrease inflammatory cytokines.

What can neurobiology teach us about Cognitive Therapy? – (Students Ask Dr. Beck — PART FIVE)

This is the fifth question from the Q&A portion of Beck Institute’s 3-Day CBT Workshop on Depression and Anxiety for students and post-doctoral fellows, held on August 15 – 17, 2011. In this video Dr. Aaron Beck discusses the evolution of neurobiological research examining changes in the brain before and after cognitive therapy; in particular, Dr. Beck notes how CBT has been shown to decrease inflammatory cytokines.

What is special about cognitive therapy? (Students Ask Dr. Beck – PART FOUR)

This is the fourth question from the Q&A portion of Beck Institute’s 3-Day CBT Workshop on Depression and Anxiety for students and post-doctoral fellows, held on August 15 – 17, 2011. In this video Dr. Aaron Beck discusses what is special about cognitive therapy, what is new theoretically in the field of CBT, and how cognitive behavior therapy has expanded. Dr. Beck explains his present notion of cognitive therapy – that it is based on a theory of psychopathology (information processing model), and the techniques that are utilized are those that can help to ameliorate the dysfunctional aspects of the individual’s beliefs, interpretations, and avoidance behaviors, as well as dysfunction in attention and memory. Dr. Beck mentions the main thrust of cognitive therapy will be to modify the dysfunctional cognitive processing. Please enjoy the fourth segment from this unique series: