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CBT for Schizophrenia

CBT Training at Beck InstituteDr. Judith Beck greeting participants at Beck Institute’s first ever CBT for Schizophrenia Workshop.

November 14 – 16, 2011, Cognitive Behavior Therapy Workshop Level ll: Personality Disorders and Challenging Problems

Dr. Judith Beck demonstrates a how to conceptualize a challenging case.

Last week at Beck Institute we held our Level 2 CBT Workshop on Personality Disorders and Challenging Problems. Psychologists, psychiatrists, social workers, counselors, and other health and mental health professionals traveled from all over the world, including Canada, India, Peru and nine U.S. states, to receive training in Cognitive Behavior Therapy.

Participants received professional training from Judith S. Beck, Ph.D., Leslie Sokol, Ph.D., and Norman Cotterell, Ph.D.  Lectures and role-plays emphasized the need for the therapeutic alliance in order to establish rapport.  Dr. Sokol

Level 2 participants watched multiple live patient sessions while at Beck Institute

discussed patient collaboration and made it clear that a therapist should always be there for the client.  The use of mood checks was discussed and participants were told that a patient will often start with negative emotions and it is critical to probe them for positives to counter the negatives.

CBT Worksheet Demonstration

Dr. Judith Beck (above) demonstrated how to use a variety of CBT worksheets for therapists to use, such as the Cognitive Conceptualization Diagram. Dr. Beck encouraged workshop participants to roleplay (left and below) with one another to practice cognitive therapy techniques for personality disorders and challenging problems. Click here to learn more about our CBT workshops and how to register for our next Level 2 in February 2012. See below for more workshop highlights:

 

October 31 – November, 2011, Cognitive Behavior Therapy Workshop Level I: Depression and Anxiety

November 2011: Psychologists, psychiatrists, physicians, social workers, professors, counselors, nurses and other professionals from mental health, medical, and related fields traveled from 11 states and 5 countries (including Brazil, Singapore, Canada, India, and the Dominican Republic) to attend this month’s Cognitive Behavior Therapy Workshop Level I on Depression and Anxiety at Beck Institute.

Participants had the opportunity to gain professional training from Aaron T. Beck, M.D., Judith S. Beck, Ph.D., and Amy Cunningham, Ph.D. Trainees participated in seminars and case discussions, reviewed videos of therapy sessions, observed and engaged in demonstration role-plays among other activities.

Cognitive Therapy Demonstration

Participants had the benefit of watching Dr. Aaron Beck conduct a live patient session, which was viewed via closed-circuit television. Following the patient interview Dr. Beck answered questions from participants in a case discussion (pictured above left), during which he explained what the next session should include. Dr. Beck explained agenda setting, beginning with a review of homework and went on to explain that he asks patients, “What problems do you want my help in solving today?” to guide them into naming the problems (as opposed to giving a full description at that moment), then prioritize the problems and let him know roughly about how much of the session they’d like to devote to each one. Participants noted some key techniques that Dr. Beck used which they found to be quite useful:

  • Normalizing patient’s emotions and beliefs
  • Providing patient with language with which they can describe and validate their thoughts
  • Instilling hope and reassuring successful treatment
  • Trying a variety of methods including imagery
  • Collaboration with the patient in terms of treatment model to prevent the patient from seeing the therapist as an authority figure
  • Finding some light anecdotes, humor can be a nice touch in sessions

Following the questions regarding the patient session, Dr. Beck answered participants’ questions on other subjects (video will be posted on our YouTube Channel).

Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Depression

Dr. Judith Beck (pictured left) spoke about cognitive behavior therapy with depressed patients and their automatic thoughts.  She emphasized psychoeducation, treatment planning, goal setting, and activity scheduling with patients.

Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Anxiety

Dr. Amy Cunningham (pictured below) spoke about the need for anxiety and the need to learn how to cope with it.  She emphasized the use of teaching problem-solving skills and building self-efficacy.

We are so pleased that so many professionals from all over the world were able to come to the Beck Institute for such an exciting workshop!

More event highlights:

Using CBT to Target Body Image Issues in Female College Smokers

A recent study showed that using CBT techniques to target body image issues among female smokers in smoking cessation intervention programs can help lower their smoking rates. High smoking rates and the health risks associated with smoking are a serious concern. An alarming twenty-two to thirty-four percent of college students smoke cigarettes. Previous research has shown that smoking rates in some female college students are related to their body image beliefs. This research used the cognitive pathway of body image and smoking to explain how females’ schemas of their body image serve as a foundation for smoking. These previous studies suggest that when females ruminate about their weight, they develop a cognitive bias about their body, which leads them to use smoking as a method for weight loss.

In the current study published in Behavior Modification researchers created two intervention programs for female college students to help them decrease the number of cigarettes they smoked. Twenty-four female college students were recruited to participate in an eight-week cognitive behavior smoking cessation program. They were placed into either an internet smoking session and body image group or an internet smoking session and exercise group. Both groups participated in a an hour long smoking cessation workshop which involved cognitive behavior therapy techniques (e.g., goal setting and skill building) followed by either a body image workshop or an exercise class. In addition, an internet site called Blackboard was used for group discussions and to distribute handouts.

Smoking, body image, and weight concerns were assessed using questionnaires following the intervention. Results showed that the smoking cessation rates for those who participated in the internet smoking session and body image group were greater than the rates for those who participated in the internet smoking session and exercise group. This research supports the hypothesis that body image schemas affect smoking habits in female college students.

In terms of limitations, the current study used a small sample size, lacked a control group, and used web-based instead of face-to-face group discussions. All of the participants involved in this research recommended the program to others, and they suggested that future studies incorporate face-to-face programs to make sure that everyone can participate and attend the sessions. The authors recommend replication studies with larger sample sizes in order to obtain more significant findings.

Napolitano, M.A., Llyod-Richardson, E.E., Marcus, B.H. (2011). Targeting body image schema for smoking cessation among college females: Rationale, program description, and pilot study results. Behavior Modification; 35(4): 323-346. PMID: 21502132.

CBT for Children and Adolescents

OCTOBER 2011:  Earlier this week, 43 child psychiatrists, school psychologists, school counselors, and other health and mental health professionals working with children and adolescents, came from 5 countries including: Brazil, Canada, Cayman Islands, Singapore, and South Africa; and from 11 US states to participate in our first ever CBT for Children and Adolescents workshop at Beck Institute. This 3-day workshop began with the basics of cognitive behavioral therapy and progressed to the application of CBT with complex cases. Cognitive theory, case conceptualization and CBT session structure were introduced. Then cognitive and behavioral interventions were explored and practiced.

Participants engaged in variety of role plays, to increase knowledge and ability to use CBT with children and adolescents and to experience using cognitive case conceptualization to select and implement interventions tailored for individual clients.

Participants received professional training from Aaron T. Beck, M.D., Torrey Creed, Ph.D., Luke Schultz, Ph.D. and Judith S. Beck, Ph.D.

One of the highlights of the workshop was a special question and answer session with Dr. Aaron Beck (video clip below).  Dr. Beck discussed. For more information on future CBT for Children and Adolescents workshops, visit our website.

What research is Dr. Beck presently involved in? (Students Ask Dr. Beck – Part SEVEN)

This is the seventh question from the Q&A portion of Beck Institute’s 3-Day CBT Workshop on Depression and Anxiety for students and post-doctoral fellows, held on August 15 – 17, 2011. In this video Dr. Aaron Beck discusses research he is presently involved in and/or leading at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Beck explains the work being done by three different teams within his unit; including clinical trials with suicidal patients, groundbreaking research on CBT treatment for schizophrenia, and a community mental health center project involving dissemination of cognitive behavior therapy.

What is the synergistic effect of medication and CBT? (Students Ask Dr. Beck – PART SIX)

This is the sixth question from the Q&A portion of Beck Institute’s 3-Day CBT Workshop on Depression and Anxiety for students and post-doctoral fellows, held on August 15 – 17, 2011. In this video Dr. Aaron Beck discusses the evolution of neurobiological research examining changes in the brain before and after cognitive therapy; in particular, Dr. Beck notes how CBT has been shown to decrease inflammatory cytokines.

What can neurobiology teach us about Cognitive Therapy? – (Students Ask Dr. Beck — PART FIVE)

This is the fifth question from the Q&A portion of Beck Institute’s 3-Day CBT Workshop on Depression and Anxiety for students and post-doctoral fellows, held on August 15 – 17, 2011. In this video Dr. Aaron Beck discusses the evolution of neurobiological research examining changes in the brain before and after cognitive therapy; in particular, Dr. Beck notes how CBT has been shown to decrease inflammatory cytokines.

Workshop on Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Weight Loss and Maintenance

This weekend Dr. Judith Beck and I (Deborah Beck Busis, Diet Program Coordinator) presented a workshop at the Beck Institute on Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Weight Loss and Maintenance.  We had a great time teaching dieters and maintainers, diet coaches, and health and mental health professionals how we apply CBT principles and techniques to the difficult problem of overweight and obesity. We used lecture, role play, and lots of Q and A.   

Some of the topics we covered were:

  • Overview of the Beck Diet Solution Program
  • Sabotaging Thinking
  • Assessment Initiating Treatment, and Structuring Sessions
  • Pre-Dieting Skills
  • Eating Habits
  • Hunger, Craving, and Emotional Eating
  • Dealing with deprivation, discouragement, and disappointment
  • The Long Haul and Maintenance
  • Reluctant Dieters and Real Life Compromises

On their evaluation forms, participants indicated that the workshop was very helpful and we hope they will use this knowledge to enrich their work with dieters and/or themselves.  As of now, our next diet workshop at the Beck Institute is scheduled for June 2, 2012.  Check back in with us and our website, though, because we add new workshops periodically. Below is a video of me discussing the importance of staying on track and getting back on track when mistakes happen:

What is special about cognitive therapy? (Students Ask Dr. Beck – PART FOUR)

This is the fourth question from the Q&A portion of Beck Institute’s 3-Day CBT Workshop on Depression and Anxiety for students and post-doctoral fellows, held on August 15 – 17, 2011. In this video Dr. Aaron Beck discusses what is special about cognitive therapy, what is new theoretically in the field of CBT, and how cognitive behavior therapy has expanded. Dr. Beck explains his present notion of cognitive therapy – that it is based on a theory of psychopathology (information processing model), and the techniques that are utilized are those that can help to ameliorate the dysfunctional aspects of the individual’s beliefs, interpretations, and avoidance behaviors, as well as dysfunction in attention and memory. Dr. Beck mentions the main thrust of cognitive therapy will be to modify the dysfunctional cognitive processing. Please enjoy the fourth segment from this unique series: