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Treating Substance Misuse Disorders with CBT

Newman

Cory Newman, PhD

If you plan to treat patients suffering from substance misuse disorders, I have good news and bad news. First, the bad news. When people habitually misuse a psychoactive chemical – whether it is alcohol, marijuana, benzodiazepines, stimulants, opioids, hallucinogens, or any other – they typically receive significant, immediate positive reinforcement (e.g., a sense of “high”) as well as powerful, immediate negative reinforcement (e.g., relief from negative emotions and/or withdrawal symptoms). Even when people are motivated to change, these experiences are formidable opponents to healthier, more stable, more meaningful sources of gratification, such as the pride one feels in having the ability to say “no” to urges, the satisfaction of having spent a productive day, and the trust of caring others, including therapists. Thus, effective treatment is at once an uphill climb.

Now, here is the good news. In order for people to overcome a substance misuse disorder, they need psychological tools, and cognitive therapy provides this very well. In a nutshell, this includes skills in self-awareness (e.g., of the onset of cravings and urges), self-instruction, planning, problem-solving, well-practiced behavioral strategies to reduce risk and to increase enjoyable sober activities, and methods of responding effectively to dysfunctional beliefs (about drugs, oneself, and one’s “relationship” to drugs). A chief text for the cognitive therapy of substance abuse (Beck, Wright, Newman, & Liese, 1993) describes seven main areas of potential psychological vulnerability, each of which represents a factor that contributes to the patient’s risk of alcohol and other substance misuse, and each of which suggests a potential area for therapeutic intervention. These include:

  1. High-risk situations, both external (e.g., people, places, and things) and internal (e.g., problematic mood states).
  2. Dysfunctional beliefs about drugs, oneself, and about one’s “relationship” with drugs.
  3. Automatic thoughts that increase arousal and the intention to drink and/or use.
  4. Physiological cravings and urges to use alcohol and other drugs.
  5. “Permission-giving beliefs” that patients hold to “justify” their drug use.
  6. Rituals and general behavioral strategies linked to the using of substances.
  7. Adverse psychological reactions to a lapse or relapse that lead to a vicious cycle.

An overarching benefit that cognitive therapy brings to the treatment of substance use disorders is its emphasis on long-term maintenance. As misusers of alcohol and other drugs are often subject to relapse episodes, therapists need to teach patients a new set of attitudes and skills on which to rely for the long run. These attitudes and skills not only improve patients’ sense of self-efficacy, they also lead to a reduction in life stressors that might otherwise increase the risk of relapse. A short (non-exhaustive) list of some of the attitudes and skills that patients learn in cognitive therapy includes:

  • Learning how to delay and distract in response to cravings, by engaging in constructive activities, writing (e.g., journaling), communicating with supportive others, going to meetings, and other positive means by which to ride out the wave of craving until it subsides.
  • Identifying dysfunctional ways of thinking (e.g., “permission-giving beliefs”) and getting into the habit of thinking and writing effective responses. For example, a patient learns to spot the thought, “I haven’t used in 90 days, so I deserve a little ‘holiday’ from my sobriety,” and to replace it with a thought such as, “What I really deserve is to keep my sobriety streak alive, to support my recovery one day at a time, including today, and to stop trying to fool myself with drug-seeking thoughts.”
  • Developing and practicing a repertoire of appropriately assertive comments with which to politely turn down offers of a drink (or other substance) from someone (e.g., “Thanks, but I’ll just have a ginger ale, doctor’s orders!”).
  • Learning how to solve problems directly and effectively, rather than trying to drown out a problem by getting impaired, which only serves to worsen the problem.
  • Becoming conversant in the “pros and cons” of using alcohol and other drugs, versus the pros and cons of being sober, and being able to address distortions in thinking along the way.
  • Practicing the behaviors and attitudes of self-respect, including counteracting beliefs that otherwise undermine oneself and lead to helplessness and hopelessness (e.g., “I’m a bad person anyway, so I might as well mess up my life by using.”).
  • Utilizing healthy social support, such as 12-step fellowship (12SF) meetings, friends and family who support sobriety, and staying away from those who would undermine therapeutic goals.
  • Making lifestyle changes that support sobriety and self-efficacy, including having a healthy daily routine, refraining from cursing and raging, engaging in meaningful hobbies, and doing things that promote spirituality and serenity (e.g., yoga).

To provide accurate empathy to patients, and to ascertain the optimal combination of validation for the status quo versus action toward change, it is important for therapists to assess the patient’s “stage of change.” Some patients are quite committed to giving up their addictive behaviors, and thus are at a high level of readiness for change. Others are more ambivalent, and may waver in their willingness to take part in treatment. Similarly, patients who are uncertain about giving up drinking and drugging may present for treatment with the goal of “cutting back” on alcohol and other drugs. Such patients may disagree that they will need to eliminate their use of psychoactive chemicals, and may decide to leave therapy if the therapist insists that the goal must be abstinence. Of course, there are some patients who are remanded for treatment who otherwise would not seek treatment on their own. They may deny that they have a problem with alcohol and other drugs, and not truly engage in the therapy process at all. The therapist’s understanding of the patient’s stage of change will be vital in helping them know just how directive to be, without going too far for a particular patient to tolerate at a given time in treatment. This sort of sensitivity may allow therapists to get the maximum out of treatment with patients who are most motivated, while retaining less motivated patients in treatment until such time as they begin to feel more a sense of ambition in dealing with their problem.

Cognitive therapy can be used in conjunction with supplemental treatments. For example, cognitive therapy can be woven into a comprehensive program in which patients (for example) take suboxone, and also attend 12SF meetings. Similar to advancements in the treatment of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, where promise has been shown in combining cognitive therapy with pharmacotherapy, the study of best practices for alcohol and substance use disorders will probably involve more instances of coordinated care. For example, the strength of medication-based treatments that diminish the patients’ subjective desire for their drug(s) of choice can be paired with the strengths of cognitive therapy in modifying faulty beliefs and maximizing skill-building.

Empirical evidence indicates that cognitive therapy has the potential to be an efficacious treatment for alcohol and other substance use disorders, especially with adult patients who present with comorbid mood disorders, and with adolescents. However, improvements in the treatment approach still can be made, most notably via alliance-enhancement strategies that may improve retention in treatment, and more routine incorporation of the “stages of change” model.

 

Learn more about upcoming workshops on CBT for Substance Use Disorders.

 

Recommended Readings

Anton, R. F., Moak, D. H., Latham, P. K., Waid, R., Malcolm, R. J., Dias, J. K., & Roberts, J. S. (2001). Posttreatment results of combining naltrexone with cognitive- behavioral therapy for the treatment of alcoholism. Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology, 21(1), 72-77.

Baker, A., Boggs, T. G., & Lewin, T. J. (2001). Randomized controlled trial of brief cognitive-behavioral interventions among regular users of amphetamine. Addiction, 96(9), 1279-1287.

Beck, A. T., Wright, F. D., Newman, C. F., & Liese, B. S. (1993). Cognitive therapy of substance abuse. New York: Guilford Press.

Deas, D., & Thomas, S. E. (2001). An overview of controlled studies of adolescent substance abuse treatment. American Journal on Addictions, 10(2), 178-189.

Maude-Griffin, P. M., Hohenstein, J. M., Humfleet, G. L., Reilly, P. M., Tusel, D .J., & Hall, S. M. (1998). Superior efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy for urban crack cocaine abusers: Main and matching effects. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 66(5), 832-837.

Newman, C. F. (2008). Substance abuse. In M. A. Whisman (Ed.), Adapting cognitive therapy for depression (pp. 233-254). New York: Guilford Press.

Nishith, P., Mueser, K. T., Srsic, C. S., & Beck, A. T. (1997). Differential response to cognitive therapy in parolees with primary and secondary substance use disorders. The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 185(12), 763-766.

Ouimette, P. C., Finney, J. W., & Moos, R. H. (1997). Twelve-Step and cognitive-behavioral treatment for substance abuse: A comparison of treatment effectiveness. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 65, 230-240.

Prochaska, J. O., & Norcross, J. C. (2002). Stages of change. In J. C. Norcross (Ed.), Psychotherapy relationships that work (pp. 303-313). New York: Oxford University Press.

Waldron, H.B., & Kaminer, Y. (2004). On the learning curve: The emerging evidence supporting cognitive-behavioral therapies for adolescent substance abuse. Addiction99, 93-105.

 

A Group Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for People in Supported Employment Programs: CBT-SE

New Study (1)

 Abstract
INTRODUCTION:
Supported employment programs are highly effective in helping people with severe mental illness obtain competitive jobs quickly. However, job tenure is often a problem for many. Of the various obstacles to job tenure documented, dysfunctional beliefs regarding the workplace and one’s own abilities has been proposed as a therapeutic target.

OBJECTIVES:
The purpose of this article is threefold: (1) to describe the development and the content of a novel group cognitive behavioral intervention designed to increase job tenure for people receiving supported employment services; (2) to present the feasibility and acceptability of the intervention; and (3) to investigate some preliminary data regarding employment outcomes. A group CBT intervention offered during 8 sessions over the course of one month, in order to respect the rapid job search principle of IPS (individual placement and support), was developed. The content was tailored to facilitate the learning of skills specific to the workplace, such as recognizing and managing one’s stressors at work, determining and modifying dysfunctional thoughts (e.g. not jumping to conclusions, finding alternatives, seeking facts), overcoming obstacles (e.g. problem solving), improving one’s self-esteem as a worker (recognizing strengths and qualities), dealing with criticism, using positive assertiveness, finding coping strategies (for symptoms and stress) to use at work, negotiating work accommodations and overcoming stigma. A trial is currently underway, with half the participants receiving supported employment as well as CBT-SE and the other half receiving only supported employment.

METHODS:
A subsample of the first 24 participants having completed the 12-month follow-up were used for the analyses, including 12 having received at least 3 sessions out of the 8 group sessions and 12 receiving only supported employment. Feasibility and acceptability were determined by the group therapists’ feedback, the participants’ feedback as well as attendance to group sessions. The work outcomes looked at with the preliminary sample only included the 12-month follow-up and involved: obtaining a competitive job, number of hours worked per week as well as number of weeks worked at the same job (>24hours).

RESULTS:
In terms of feasibility and acceptability, therapists and participants all mentioned appreciating the group, finding it useful and helpful, some even mentioning feeling grateful to have had the opportunity to receive the intervention. The only negative feedback received pertained to the frequency of the meetings, which could be brought down to one meeting per week of two hours instead of two one-hour sessions per week. Participation was very good, with the average number of sessions attended being of 6/8. In terms of work outcomes, 50 % of all participants in both conditions found competitive work. Out of those working competitively, the number of participants working more than 24hours per week at the 12-month follow-up was higher in the CBT-SE group compared to the control condition (75 % vs. 50 %). Similarly, there was a trend towards the number of consecutive weeks worked at the same job being slightly superior at the 12-month follow-up for those who had received the CBT-SE intervention (22.5 weeks vs. 18.3 weeks).

DISCUSSION:
The preliminary results support previous studies where on average 50 % of people registered in supported employment programs obtain competitive work. We confirmed that the intervention was feasible and acceptable. Preliminary data suggest that the CBT-SE intervention might help people with severe mental illness use skills and gain the needed confidence enabling them to work longer hours and consecutive weeks. These results should be considered with caution given that only 24 participants were looked at whereas the final sample size will be of 160 participants. Nonetheless, these preliminary results are promising. Furthermore, additional information regarding the impact of the CBT-SE intervention on the capacity to overcome obstacles at work, self-esteem as a worker, as well as other work-related variables have been collected but have not been investigated here. Once the study is completed, the results should enlighten us regarding the usefulness of offering CBT-SE not only in terms of work outcomes but also in improving various psychosocial domains linked to workplace satisfaction.

Lecomte, T., Corbiere, M., & Lysaker, P.H. (2014). A group cognitive behavioral intervention for people in supported employment programs: CBT-SE. Encephale. 40, 81-90. doi: 10.106/j.encep.2014.04.005.

Therapeutic Alliance in Face-to-Face and Telephone-Administered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

New Study (1)

Abstract
OBJECTIVE:
Telephone-administered therapies have emerged as an alternative method of delivery for the treatment of depression, yet concerns persist that the use of the telephone may have a deleterious effect on therapeutic alliance. The purpose of this study was to compare therapeutic alliance in clients receiving cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for depression by telephone (T-CBT) or face-to-face (FtF-CBT).

METHOD:
We randomized 325 participants to receive 18 sessions of T-CBT or FtF-CBT. The Working Alliance Inventory (WAI) was administered at Weeks 4 and 14. Depression was measured during treatment and over 1 year posttreatment follow-up using the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and Patient Health Questionnaire-9.

RESULTS:
There were no significant differences in client or therapist WAI between T-CBT or FtF-CBT (Cohen’s f² ranged from 0 to .013, all ps > .05). All WAI scores predicted depression end of treatment outcomes (Cohen’s f² ranged from .009 to .06, all ps < .02). The relationship between the WAI and depression outcomes did not vary by treatment group (Cohen’s f² ranged from 0 to .004, ps > .07). The WAI did not significantly predict depression during posttreatment follow-up (all ps > .12).

CONCLUSIONS:
Results from this analysis do not support the hypothesis that the use of the telephone to provide CBT reduces therapeutic alliance relative to FtF-CBT.

Stiles-Shields, C., Kwasny, M.J., Cai, X., & Mohr, D.C. (2014). Therapeutic alliance in face-to-face and telephone-administered cognitive behavioral therapy. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 82(2), 349-354. doi: 10.1037/a0035554.

Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Armodafinil for Insomnia After Cancer Treatment

New Study (1)Abstract

PURPOSE:

Insomnia is a distressing and often persisting consequence of cancer. Although cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is the treatment of choice in the general population, the use of CBT-I in patients with cancer is complicated, because it can result in transient but substantial increases in daytime sleepiness. In this study, we evaluated whether CBT-I, in combination with the wakefulness-promoting agent armodafinil (A), results in better insomnia treatment outcomes in cancer survivors than CBT-I alone.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

We report on a randomized trial of 96 cancer survivors (mean age, 56 years; female, 87.5%; breast cancer, 68%). The primary analyses examined whether ? one of the 7-week intervention conditions (ie, CBT-I, A, or both), when compared with a placebo capsule (P) group, produced significantly greater clinical gains. Insomnia was assessed by the Insomnia Severity Index and sleep quality by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Inventory. All patients received sleep hygiene instructions.

RESULTS:

Analyses controlling for baseline differences showed that both the CBT-I plus A (P = .001) and CBT-I plus P (P = .010) groups had significantly greater reductions in insomnia severity postintervention than the P group, with effect sizes of 1.31 and 1.02, respectively. Similar improvements were seen for sleep quality. Gains on both measures persisted 3 months later. CBT-I plus A was not significantly different from CBT-I plus P (P = .421), and A alone was not significantly different from P alone (P = .584).

CONCLUSION:

CBT-I results in significant and durable improvements in insomnia and sleep quality. A did not significantly improve the efficacy of CBT-I or independently affect insomnia or sleep quality

Roscoe, J.A., Garland, S.N., Heckler, C.E., Perlis, M.L., Peoples, A.R., Shayne, M.,…Morrow, G.R. (2015). Randomized placebo-controlled trial of cognitive behavioral therapy and armodafinil for insomnia after cancer treatment. Journal of Clinical Oncology, 33(2), 165-171. doi: 10.1200/JCO.2014.57.6769.

Evaluation of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Drinking. Outcome of Japanese Alcoholic Patients.

New Study (1)Abstract

This study examined the efficacy of a group-based cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) for Japanese alcoholic outpatients. Participants (N = 169) were assigned either to a CBT-based relapse prevention group or a TAU (treatment as usual) group. The CBT group received 12-session CBT treatment with a structured treatment workbook once a week. The TAU group received usual daycare treatment including 12-step meeting, vocational training and leisure activities. Participants in the CBT group demonstrated a significantly low relapse rate at the end of treatment. Moreover, coping skills of the CBT group participants were significantly improved than those of the TAU group at the 6-month follow-up period. However, at the 6-month follow-up, the difference in relapse rates diminished. The effectiveness of CBT for alcoholics was well documented in Western countries but few studies were conducted outside of the West. The results provide support for the use of CBT for Japanese alcoholics.

 

Harada, T., Yamamura, K., Koshiba, A., Ohishi, H., & Ohishi, M. (2014). Evaluation of

cognitive-behavioral therapy for drinking.  Outcome of Japanese alcoholic patients.

Nihon Arukoru Yakubutsu Igakkai Zasshi. 49(5), 249-258

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

New Study (1)

Abstract
The efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has been the subject of much study over the past fifteen years. Building on a foundation of case studies and open clinical trials, the literature now contains many methodologically sound studies that have compared full CBT protocols to waitlist controls, pill placebo, psychosocial comparison conditions, active medication, combined treatments, and brief CBT. This review is part of a series commissioned by The Canadian Institute for Obsessive Compulsive Disorders (CIOCD) in an effort to publish in one place what is known about the efficacy of treatments for OCD. A total of fourteen studies were identified; collectively their findings support the efficacy of CBT for youth with OCD. CBT protocols that emphasized either strictly behavioral or cognitive conceptualizations have each been found efficacious relative to waitlist controls. Efforts to enhance CBT’s efficacy and reach have been undertaken. These trials provide guidance regarding next steps to be taken to maximize efficacy and treatment availability. Findings from studies in community clinics suggest that significant treatment benefits can be realized and are not reported only from within academic contexts. These findings bode well for broader dissemination efforts. Recommendations for future research directions are provided.

Franklin, M.E., Kratz, H.E., Freeman, J.B., Ivarsson, T., Heyman, I., Sookman,D.,…March, J. (2015). Cognitive-behavioral therapy for pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder: Empirical review and clinical recommendations. Psychiatry Research, 227(1), 78-92. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2015.02.009

Protocol: Reducing Suicidal Ideation Among Turkish Migrants in the Netherlands and in the UK: Effectiveness of an Online Intervention

New Study (1)Abstract
Background: The Turkish community living in Europe has an increased risk for suicidal ideation and attempted suicide. Online self-help may be an effective way of engagement with this community. This study will evaluate the effectiveness of a culturally adapted, guided, cognitive behavioural therapy-based online self-help intervention targeting suicidal ideation for Turkish adults living in the Netherlands and in the UK.
Methods and design: This study will be performed in two phases. First, the Dutch online intervention will be adapted to Turkish culture. The second phase will be a randomized controlled trial with two conditions: experimental and waiting-list control. Ethical approval has been granted for the trials in London and Amsterdam. The experimental group will obtain direct access to the intervention, which will take 6 weeks to complete. Participants in the waiting-list condition will obtain access to the modules after 6 weeks. Participants in both conditions will be assessed at baseline, post-test and 3 months post-test follow-up. The primary outcome measure is reduction in frequency and intensity of suicidal thoughts. Secondary outcome measures are self-harm, attempted suicide, suicide ideation attributes, depression, hopelessness, anxiety, quality of life, worrying and satisfaction with the treatment.
Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/09540261.2014.996121

Written by 2013 Student Scholarship Recipient: Ozlem Eylem:

Eylem, O., van Straten, A., Bhui, K., & Kerkhofl, J.F.M. (2015). Protocol: Reducing suicidal
ideation among Turkish migrants in the Netherlands and in the UK: Effectiveness of an online intervention. International Review of Psychiatry, 27(1), 72-81. doi:
10.3109/09540261.2014.996121

Characteristics of U.S. Veterans Who Begin and Complete Prolonged Exposure and Cognitive Processing Therapy for PTSD

New Study (1)Abstract

This retrospective chart-review study examined patient-level correlates of initiation and completion of evidence-based psychotherapy (EBP) for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among treatment-seeking U.S. veterans. We identified all patients (N = 796) in a large Veterans Affairs PTSD and anxiety clinic who attended at least 1 individual psychotherapy appointment with 1 of 8 providers trained in EBP. Within this group, 91 patients (11.4%) began EBP (either Cognitive Processing Therapy or Prolonged Exposure) and 59 patients (7.9%) completed EBP. The medical records of all EBP patients (n = 91) and a provider-matched sample of patients who received another form of individual psychotherapy (n = 66) were reviewed by 4 independent raters. Logistic regression analyses revealed that Iraq and Afghanistan veterans were less likely to begin EBP than veterans from other service eras, OR = 0.48, 95% CI = [0.24, 0.94], and veterans who were service connected for PTSD were more likely than veterans without service connection to begin EBP, OR = 2.33, 95% CI = [1.09, 5.03]. Among those who began EBP, Iraq and Afghanistan veteran status, OR = 0.09, 95% CI = [0.03, 0.30], and a history of psychiatric inpatient hospitalization, OR = 0.13, 95% CI = [0.03, 0.54], were associated with decreased likelihood of EBP completion.

 

Mott, J.M., Mondragon, S., Hundt, N.E., Beason-Smith, M., Grady, R.H., & Teng, E.J. (2014).Characteristics of U.S. veterans who begin and complete prolonged exposure and cognitive processing therapy for PTSD. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 27(3), 265-273.doi: 10.1002/jts.21927.

Effects of Psychotherapy on Trauma-related Cognitions in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Meta-Analysis

New Study (1)Abstract

In the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) incorporate trauma-related cognitions. This adaptation of the criteria has consequences for the treatment of PTSD. Until now, comprehensive information about the effect of psychotherapy on trauma-related cognitions has been lacking. Therefore, the goal of our meta-analysis was to determine which psychotherapy most effectively reduces trauma-related cognitions.

Our literature search for randomized controlled trials resulted in 16 studies with data from 994 participants. We found significant effect sizes favoring trauma-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy as compared to nonactive or active nontrauma-focused control conditions of Hedges’ g = 1.21, 95% CI [0.69, 1.72], p < .001 and g = 0.36, 95% CI [0.09, 0.63], p = .009, respectively. Treatment conditions with elements of cognitive restructuring and treatment conditions with elements of exposure, but no cognitive restructuring reduced trauma-related cognitions almost to the same degree. Treatments with cognitive restructuring had small advantages over treatments without cognitive restructuring.

We concluded that trauma-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy effectively reduces trauma-related cognitions. Treatments comprising either combinations of cognitive restructuring and imaginal exposure and in vivo exposure, or imaginal exposure and in vivo exposure alone showed the largest effects.

 

Diehle, J., Schmitt, K., Daams, J.G., Boer, F., & Lindauer, R.J. (2014). Effects of psychotherapy on trauma-related cognitions in posttraumatic stress disorder: a meta-analysis. Journal of  Traumatic Stress, 27(3), 257-264. doi: 10.1002/jts.21924.

Disrupting The Downward Spiral of Chronic Pain and Opioid Addiction With Mindfulness-oriented Recovery Enhancement: A Review of Clinical Outcomes and Neurocognitive Targets

New Study (1)Abstract

Prescription opioid misuse and addiction among chronic pain patients are problems of growing medical and social significance. Chronic pain patients often require intervention to improve their well-being and functioning, and yet, the most commonly available form of pharmacotherapy for chronic pain is centered on opioid analgesics–drugs that have high abuse liability. Consequently, health care and legal systems are often stymied in their attempts to intervene with individuals who suffer from both pain and addiction. As such, novel, nonpharmacologic interventions are needed to complement pharmacotherapy and interrupt the cycle of behavioral escalation. The purpose of this paper is to describe how the downward spiral of chronic pain and prescription opioid misuse may be targeted by one such intervention, Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement (MORE), a new behavioral treatment that integrates elements from mindfulness training, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and positive psychology. The clinical outcomes and neurocognitive mechanisms of this intervention are reviewed with respect to their effects on the risk chain linking chronic pain and prescription opioid misuse. Future directions for clinical and pharmacologic research are discussed.

 

Garland, E.L. (2014). Disrupting the downward spiral of chronic pain and opioid addiction with mindfulness-oriented recovery enhancement: a review of clinical outcomes and neurocognitive targets. Journal of Pain and Palliative Care Pharmacotherapy, 28(2), 122-129. doi: 10.3109/15360288.2014.911791.