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Evaluation of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Drinking. Outcome of Japanese Alcoholic Patients.

New Study (1)Abstract

This study examined the efficacy of a group-based cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) for Japanese alcoholic outpatients. Participants (N = 169) were assigned either to a CBT-based relapse prevention group or a TAU (treatment as usual) group. The CBT group received 12-session CBT treatment with a structured treatment workbook once a week. The TAU group received usual daycare treatment including 12-step meeting, vocational training and leisure activities. Participants in the CBT group demonstrated a significantly low relapse rate at the end of treatment. Moreover, coping skills of the CBT group participants were significantly improved than those of the TAU group at the 6-month follow-up period. However, at the 6-month follow-up, the difference in relapse rates diminished. The effectiveness of CBT for alcoholics was well documented in Western countries but few studies were conducted outside of the West. The results provide support for the use of CBT for Japanese alcoholics.

 

Harada, T., Yamamura, K., Koshiba, A., Ohishi, H., & Ohishi, M. (2014). Evaluation of

cognitive-behavioral therapy for drinking.  Outcome of Japanese alcoholic patients.

Nihon Arukoru Yakubutsu Igakkai Zasshi. 49(5), 249-258

CBT is Effective for Pathological Gambling

OBJECTIVE: Clinicians lack adequate data on the effectiveness of treatment for pathological gambling in low- and middle-income countries.

METHODS: We evaluated a manualized treatment program that included components of cognitive-behavioral therapy, motivational interviewing, and imaginal exposure in a sample of 128 participants diagnosed with pathological gambling. Our team recruited participants via the helpline of the National Responsible Gambling Program (NRGP) of South Africa between May 2011 and February 2012. Eligible participants, who met the DSM-IV-TR criteria for pathological gambling as assessed by the Structured Clinical Interview for Pathological Gambling (SCI-PG), were referred to practitioners who had been trained in the intervention technique. We then compared pre- and post-treatment scores obtained on the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale Adapted for Pathological Gambling (PG-YBOCS), the primary outcome measure, and the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS), the secondary outcome measure.

RESULTS: Scores obtained on the PG-YBOCS and the SDS both decreased significantly from the first to the final session (t[127] = 23.74, P < .001, r = .9; t[127] = 19.23, P < .001, r = .86, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS: The urges and disability symptoms related to pathological gambling were significantly reduced among participants completing treatment. These preliminary results hold promise for individuals with pathological gambling in South Africa and other low- and middle-income countries.

Pasche, S. C., Stein, D. J., Sinclair, H., Sinclair, H., Collins, P., Pretorius, A., & Grant, J. E. (January 01, 2013). The effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioral intervention for pathological gambling: A country-wide study. Annals of Clinical Psychiatry, 25, 4, 250-256.

Changes in Early Maladaptive Schemas After Residential Treatment for Substance Use

Early maladaptive schemas are cognitive and behavioral patterns that cause considerable distress and are theorized to underlie mental health problems. Research suggests that early maladaptive schemas may underlie substance abuse and that the intensity of early maladaptive schemas may decrease after brief periods of abstinence. The current study examined changes in early maladaptive schemas after a 4-week residential substance use treatment program. Preexisting records of a sample of male alcohol- and opioid-dependent treatment seeking adults (N = 97; mean age = 42.55) were reviewed for the current study. Pre-post analyses demonstrated that 8 of the early maladaptive schemas significantly decreased by the end of the 4-week treatment. Findings indicate that early maladaptive schemas can be modified during brief substance use treatment and may be an important component of substance use intervention programs. Implications of these findings for substance use treatment are discussed.

Shorey, R. C., Stuart, G. L., Anderson, S., & Strong, D. R. (September 01, 2013). Changes in Early Maladaptive Schemas After Residential Treatment for Substance Use. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 69(9), 912-922.

 

CBT for Substance Abuse

In this video from a recent CBT workshop at the Beck Institute, Dr. Aaron Beck discusses his academic and clinical history in the treatment of substance abuse. He speaks of his early clinical trials involving cognitive therapy for substance abuse. Dr. Beck also references a recent book, Group Cognitive Therapy for Addictions, which he co-authored with Amy Wenzel, Ph.D., Bruce Liese, Ph.D., and Dara Friedman-Wheeler, Ph.D.

For CBT resources, visit Beck Institute’s CBT Store.

Beck Institute’s next CBT for Substance Abuse Workshop will take place April 15-17, 2013. For more information, or to sign-up, visit our website.

CBT for Substance Abuse

In this video from a recent CBT workshop at the Beck Institute, Dr. Aaron Beck discusses cognitive behavior therapy for addictions and explains the methodology and effectiveness of in-office desensitization with substance use disorder patients. Dr. Beck also references a recent book, Group Cognitive Therapy for Addictions, which he co-authored with Amy Wenzel, Ph.D., Bruce Liese, Ph.D., and Dara Friedman-Wheeler, Ph.D.

For CBT resources, visit Beck Institute’s CBT Store:

Beck Institute’s next CBT for Substance Abuse Workshop will take place April 15-17, 2013. For more information, or to sign-up, visit our website.

CBT is Effective for Cocaine Addiction

A recent study published in Addictive Behaviors sought to determine whether the use of D-cycloserine (DCS), a cognitive enhancer, would improve the effects of CBT treatment and boost abstinence and treatment retention goals among cocaine addicts. Forty-four patients were randomly assigned to receive TAU (12-Step technique), four weeks of CBT treatment combined with DCS medication, or four weeks of CBT treatment combined with a placebo medication.

Results indicate that the condensed form of CBT was more effective than TAU. Furthermore, the addition of DCS did not increase CBT efficacy. In fact, the CBT plus placebo group showed slightly greater abstinence and retention rates than CBT plus DCS. This study adds to previous research that supports the use of CBT to promote relapse prevention and functional recovery among patients with cocaine addictions.

Kennedy, A. P., Gross, R. E., Whitfield, N., Drexler, K. P. G., & Kilts, C. D. (2012) A controlled trial of the adjunct use of D-cycloserine to facilitate cognitive behavioral therapy outcomes in a cocaine-dependent population. Addictive Behaviors, 37(8), 900-907.

Seeking Safety Treatment Improves Outcomes in Patient with Substance Use Disorders and Co-Occurring PTSD

According to a recent study published in Addiction, seeking safety treatment (SS), a manualized, present-focused, cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) treatment program for substance use disorders and PTSD, is associated with better drug use outcomes than treatment as usual. The current study compared treatment as usual to a combination of SS and treatment as usual. Results indicate that SS may reduce drug use in veterans with substance use disorders and PTSD better than treatment as usual, and works as well as treatment as usual in reducing alcohol use and PTSD symptoms. SS is also associated with greater treatment attendance, treatment satisfaction, and improvements in active coping. Requirements for training, supervision and consultation in SS is less costly than other evidence-based treatments for PTSD, which may increase its feasibility of use. Seeking safety treatment was developed by Lisa Najavits, Ph.D.

Boden, M. T., Kimerling, R., Jacobs-Lentz, J., Bowman, D., Weaver, C., Carney, D., Trafton, J. A.,& Walser, R. (2012). Seeking Safety treatment for male veterans with a substance use disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder symptomatology. Addiction, 107(3), 578-586.

HBO Film on Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Addiction

HBO is launching a new addiction project, and one of its films features Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) as the “most effective treatment for stimulant addiction.” The film follows a group of individuals undergoing CBT treatment for addiction at the Matrix Institute in California.   Read more