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Integrating New Wave Therapies and CBT

In this video from a recent Beck Institute Workshop, Dr. Aaron Beck discusses how new wave therapies can be integrated into the cognitive therapy (CT) framework. Dr. Beck describes when it is helpful to utilize newer strategies that encompass for example, acceptance and commitment therapy, mindfulness, and dialectical behavior therapy. Dr. Beck emphasizes the importance of using these strategies within the general theoretical model of CT and specific case formulation of the disorder in order to address patients’ specific needs based on their individual case conceptualization.

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Validation for Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder

During a recent Beck Institute Workshop, Dr. Aaron Beck explains that in recent years eastern philosophies and religions have had an increased influence on CBT and which have been incorporated into mindfulness based cognitive therapy, acceptance and commitment therapy, and dialectic behavior therapy. In discussing DBT, he emphasizes the importance of validation with borderline personality disorder patients.

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Long-Term Comparison of Traditional CBT and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy

According to a recent study published in Behavior Therapy, traditional cognitive behavior therapy (CT) may be more effective for treating anxiety and depression in the long-term than Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). The current study is a follow up comparison of the long-term outcomes of CT and ACT. The original study measured symptoms of students seeking treatment, (n=132) age 18-52 (M=26.7) before and after receiving CT and ACT. At post treatment, both groups improved on measures of depression, anxiety, and general functioning, and the results did not yield a significant difference in effectiveness between the two samples receiving treatment.

This long-term follow up study, conducted 18 months later included a majority (n=91) of the original sample who received either CT (n=45) or ACT (n=46). Although participants in both treatment groups benefitted initially from the different therapies, participants from the CT treatment group gained significant and lasting improvement in their symptoms and functioning:

 

  • 81.8% of CT patients versus 60.7% of ACT patients remained reliably recovered on measures of depression (Beck Depression Inventory-II);
  • 72.7% of CT patients versus 56.0% ACT patients remained in the recovered range for anxiety (Beck Anxiety Inventory);
  • 46.4% of CT patients versus 22.6% ACT patients maintained improvements in interpersonal and occupational functioning (Outcome Questionnaire); and
  • 37.8% of CT patients versus 22.9% of ACT patients remained in the normative range on measures of quality of life (Quality of Life Inventory).

This is the first known comparison of the long-term efficiency of CT versus ACT. While research and replication studies are necessary, these preliminary findings suggest that traditional CT has long-term advantages over ACT in treating depression and anxiety, and in increasing general functioning and overall quality of life.

Forman, E.M., Shaw, J.A., Goetter E.M., Herbert, J.D., Park, J.A., & Yuen, E.K, (2012). Long-term follow-up of a randomized controlled trial comparing acceptance and commitment therapy and standard cognitive behavior therapy for anxiety and depression. Behavior     Therapy, 43(4) 801-811

Systems of Psychotherapy (Part 3)

In this video from Beck Institute’s recent CBT Workshop for Students and Faculty, Dr. Aaron Beck first explains the fundamental methodology of meditation-based therapies, including acceptance and commitment therapy and mindfulness-based therapy. Dr. Beck explains that these therapies require patients to actively experience negative, dysfunctional thoughts and accept them without trying to change them. Through acceptance, patients are able to decenter themselves, gain greater distance, and greater objectivity. Next Dr. Beck delves into relationship-based therapies. Rooted in Rogerian therapy, the main tenets of relationship-based therapies include the therapist’s total acceptance of the patient, genuine warmth, and accurate empathy. Dr. Beck describes these tenets as important qualities of every therapist.

Click here to view part 1 of this video on the Beck Institute YouTube channel.

Click here to view part 2 of this video on the Beck Institute YouTube channel.