CBT Via Video Teleconferencing is Effective for PTSD in Vets

According to a recent pilot study published in the Journal of Traumatic Stress, group cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) delivered via video teleconferencing is a safe, feasible, and effective treatment for veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Participants in the current study included 13 veterans diagnosed with PTSD at VA clinics in the Hawaiian Islands; each was randomly assigned to receive group cognitive processing therapy (a form of cognitive behavior therapy originally developed by Patricia Resick, Ph.D.) in an in-person therapy group or video teleconferencing therapy group. According to results, both groups displayed reductions in PTSD symptoms, without between-group differences on process outcome variables. In addition, participants in each group expressed high levels of treatment credibility, satisfaction with treatment, and homework adherence. A full randomized control trial (RCT) is currently underway to more rigorously evaluate the clinical effectiveness of cognitive processing therapy delivered via video teleconferencing.

To find out more about Beck Institute’s Soldier Suicide Prevention initiative visit www.cbtforsoldiers.org.

Morland, L. A., Hynes, A. K., Mackintosh, M., Resick, P. A., & Chard, K. M. (2011). Group cognitive processing therapy delivered to veterans via telehealth: A pilot cohort. Journal Of Traumatic Stress, 24(4), 465-469. doi:10.1002/jts.20661

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