Dr. Aaron Beck’s 95th Birthday

Today, July 18, 2016, is Dr. Aaron Beck’s 95th birthday. At last week’s workshop, participants celebrated by signing ‘Happy Birthday” and hearing stories from Dr. Beck.



Part 1

We recommend beginning this video at 2:40

Part 2



Drs. Beck and Evans Discuss Evidence-Based Practices

Within the span of a few decades Dr. Aaron T. Beck, widely regarded as the “Father of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy”, has changed the way we think about mental health treatment. In 2007 the city of Philadelphia’s Department of Behavioral Health and Intellectual disAbility Services (DBHIDS), and Dr. Aaron Beck joined in a collaboration unlike any other to bring Cognitive Behavioral Therapy out of academia and into Philadelphia’s behavioral health system.

This unique partnership is one of many strategies employed by DBHIDS to ensure that all Philadelphians have access to the most effective treatments. To capture this fascinating story Dr. Beck, and DBHIDS’ Commissioner Dr. Arthur C. Evans have joined to create this short video about their work.

What Therapists Can Do When They Become “Stuck” in Session

Advice for Working with Clients Who are Focused on the Past

In this video from a recent Beck Institute Workshop, Dr. Aaron Beck gives advice on how a clinician can keep a client presently focused in order to achieve the most effective results from therapy.

The Development of Anxiety Disorders

Dr. Aaron Beck discusses “nature versus nurture” in families with a history of anxiety disorders

The Role of Focus within the New Generic Cognitive Model

At a recent Beck Institute Workshop, Dr. Aaron Beck, Dr. Judith Beck, and Dr. Torrey Creed discuss the central role of focus within the new generic cognitive model (See Beck, A.T., & Haigh, E.A.P., 2014). Dr. Beck further describes the inattention bias among clients and cautions about the risk of overusing refocusing to avoid unpleasant feelings.

For CBT Resources, visit https://www.beckinstitute.org

CBT and Medication for Severe Mental Illness

In this video from a recent Beck Institute Workshop, Dr. Aaron Beck and Dr. Judith Beck discuss the effects of combining CBT and medication in the treatment of depression and schizophrenia. They also compare research findings on CBT treatment alone, medication alone, and a combination of CBT and medication among clients with severe depression and schizophrenia.

For CBT resources, visit our website.

Cognitive Restructuring in Schizophrenia

In this video from a recent Beck Institute Workshop, Dr. Aaron Beck describes how to modify and utilize cognitive restructuring with a schizophrenic client. Using an example, Dr. Beck explains that he will initially focus on the client’s interests to build engagement and self-efficacy. As self-efficacy increases, the client’s problematic and unhelpful behaviors begin to decrease. Dr. Beck emphasizes the use of cognitive conceptualization to target the variables that drive the client’s behavior, which can be used to structure treatment.

For CBT resources, visit our website.

Dr. Aaron Beck’s Transition from Psychoanalysis to Cognitive Theory

During a recent Beck Institute Workshop, Dr. Aaron Beck describes how he transitioned from psychoanalysis to cognitive theory. Dr. Beck explains that his transition period spanned two years and began when he discovered a lack of empirical evidence supporting psychoanalytic theory of depression. He subsequently began to question the effectiveness of psychoanalysis in the treatment of depression. In 1963, Dr. Beck published “Thinking and Depression: Idiosyncratic Content and Cognitive Distortions” in the Archives of General Psychiatry, widely recognized as his first publication on Cognitive Therapy.

For CBT resources, visit our website.

CBT Treatment Goals for Schizophrenia

In this video from a recent Beck Institute Workshop, Dr. Aaron Beck describes the shift in treatment aims for clients with Schizophrenia. He explains that previously “getting better” meant a decrease in symptoms of delusions and hallucinations. Today, Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) aims to help clients function in their communities, whether or not they still experience symptoms. Dr. Beck goes on to say that when clients reintegrate into society, overall adaptive functioning typically improves.

For CBT resources, visit our website.