The Future of CBT

At a recent Beck Institute Workshop, Dr. Aaron Beck discusses the future status of CBT. Dr. Beck proposes that there will be one overarching theory based on the cognitive model with information from other disciplines, and empirically supported treatment methods for each disorder. Using the example of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, he provides his vision of a triage model that would be used to determine level of care to treat patients with various disorders.

For CBT resources, visit our website.

November 14 – 16, 2011, Cognitive Behavior Therapy Workshop Level ll: Personality Disorders and Challenging Problems

Dr. Judith Beck demonstrates a how to conceptualize a challenging case.

Last week at Beck Institute we held our Level 2 CBT Workshop on Personality Disorders and Challenging Problems. Psychologists, psychiatrists, social workers, counselors, and other health and mental health professionals traveled from all over the world, including Canada, India, Peru and nine U.S. states, to receive training in Cognitive Behavior Therapy.

Participants received professional training from Judith S. Beck, Ph.D., Leslie Sokol, Ph.D., and Norman Cotterell, Ph.D.  Lectures and role-plays emphasized the need for the therapeutic alliance in order to establish rapport.  Dr. Sokol

Level 2 participants watched multiple live patient sessions while at Beck Institute

discussed patient collaboration and made it clear that a therapist should always be there for the client.  The use of mood checks was discussed and participants were told that a patient will often start with negative emotions and it is critical to probe them for positives to counter the negatives.

CBT Worksheet Demonstration

Dr. Judith Beck (above) demonstrated how to use a variety of CBT worksheets for therapists to use, such as the Cognitive Conceptualization Diagram. Dr. Beck encouraged workshop participants to roleplay (left and below) with one another to practice cognitive therapy techniques for personality disorders and challenging problems. Click here to learn more about our CBT workshops and how to register for our next Level 2 in February 2012. See below for more workshop highlights:

 

CT reduces cerebral atrophy in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Researchers from Raboud University Nijmegen investigated whether Cognitive Therapy (CT) affected the cerebral atrophy of patients suffering from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS).

The study appeared in BRAIN: A Journal of Neurology.

The study included twenty-two CFS patients and twenty-two control subjects, all of whom underwent a two-step program of CBT. The initial focus of treatment is a “rehabilitative approach of a graded increase in physical activity,” while the second part emphasizes a “psychological approach that addresses thoughts and beliefs about CFS which may impair recovery.”

Upon completion of the CBT treatment, the CFS patients experienced significant improvement in their physical status as well as their cognitive performance. Furthermore, the CFS patients, who had initially shown significantly lower grey matter volume than the control subjects, showed a significant increase in grey matter volume through the work of CBT.

The results of this study, which included the partially reversed cerebral atrophy after effective CBT, are an “example of macroscopic cortical plasticity in the adult human brain, demonstrating a surprisingly dynamic relation between behavioural state and cerebral anatomy. Furthermore, (their) results reveal a possible neurobiological substrate of psychotherapeutic treatment.”

Study authors: F. P. de Lange, A. Koers, J. S. Kalkman, et al.

Adolescents with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome experience enduring benefits of CBT

A new study in Pediatrics reported that adolescents with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) who received 10 sessions (over 5 months) of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) continued to experience positive effects at 2-year follow-up. Researchers measured fatigue, functional impairment, school attendance, and work attendance (where applicable). At follow-up, participants continued to experience the same improvement in fatigue as they had at the end of treatment. Their physical functioning, school attendance, and work attendance actually improved during the follow-up period. The authors recommended that this treatment become available to more adolescent patients with CFS.

Study authors: H. Knoop, M. Stulemeijer, L. W. A. M. de Jong, T. J. W. Fiselier, G. Bleijenberg